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12 Times When Disney Movies Copied Each Other And You Didn't Notice

12 Times When Disney Movies Copied Each Other And You Didn’t Notice

It’s just the nature of the craft – animation studios have been forced to find shortcuts in order to make the whole process easier. And Disney is no exception. Perhaps, in fact, it’s the studio that invented the craft.

Back when the studio began, in the first half of the 20th century, the process of animating was very different from today – but still, in a way, similar. But instead of being able to copy and paste like nowadays, imagine you had to redraw, a thousand times, the same thing by hand? Not so easy now, is it?

Naturally, as time progressed, artists and animators just had to create a number of pre-set animations that they could use in a variety of different cartoons.

disney

Source: Youtube

Because, the reality was this: Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937) was made up of a million of hand-drawn images (think frames). Having a runtime of 83 minutes, it means that an army of 570 artists had to spend 3 full years carefully drawing – by hand – all those images!

Crazy, right? Damn right. And that’s why they had to be creative and find shortcuts to make their workload easier. This included using the same scenes and animation sets in different cartoons, and today, thanks to Providr, we’ll be taking a look at them.

1. Robin Hood (1973) used material from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)

Source: Walt Disney Studios

2. Robin Hood also borrowed from The Jungle Book (1967), another classic.

Source: Walt Disney Studios

3. And it seems that The Jungle Book (1967) borrowed from 101 Dalmatians (1961).

Source: Walt Disney Studios

4. The Sword in the Stone (1963) in turn helped The Jungle Book, for example.

Source: Walt Disney Studios

5. It was the same for 101 Dalmatians – try to remember this scene:

Source: Walt Disney Studios

And compare it with this one, from The Sword in the Stone, below:

Source: Walt Disney Studios

6. But wait, The Sword in the Stone (1963) borrows from The Truth About Mother Goose (1957).

Source: Walt Disney Studios

7. Coincidence? I think not! Check out this Winnie the Pooh scene:

Source: Walt Disney Studios

And compare it with this scene in The Jungle Book:

Source: Walt Disney Studios

8. The similarities don’t end there – the difference is just the (lack of) clothes:

Source: Walt Disney Studios

9. The Princess and the Frog (2009) copies The Sword in the Stone too:

Source: Walt Disney Studios

Louis the Alligator is basically Madame Mim! One time, she even turns into an alligator!

Source: Walt Disney Studios

10. Alice in Wonderland (1951) borrows from Pinocchio (1940).

Source: Walt Disney Studios

11. Copy & Paste that Princess: Beauty and the Beast (1999) and Sleeping Beauty (1955).

Source: Walt Disney Studios

12. Bears can be copied too! Compare Baloo and Little John from Robin Hood.

Source: Walt Disney Studios

Well, you know what they say – what has been seen cannot be unseen. Now I’ll never look at another animated movie with the same eyes again!

From: providr