A Company Celebrates The Female Nipple While Raising Awareness About Breast Cancer

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The female nipple had a significant role during the sexual revolution that coupled the counterculture and human rights movements of the 1960s and the 1970s. The time of many firsts, it was probably the first time in modern history women started discarding the wretched brassiere en masse and in public.

Going braless was above all a political feminist statement, an end of an era during which women were merely reproductive and housekeeping machines. A free nipple said more than one could ever shout from a rooftop.

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Now, a company whose motto is “Liberty and Just Nips for all!” is reviving the appreciation for nipples and the understanding of their power and message through one simple accessory.

Just Nips are selling stick on nipples whose size ranges from ‘cold’ to ‘freezing’ which will make the wearer “look cold while feeling hot”.

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But Just Nips founder Molly Borman claims her product’s role is much wider than just accessorizing. She hopes that trans women and breast cancer survivors can use the nipples to feel a little bit more feminine. Molly is also working with a charity to print breast self-exam instructions on the packaging to help raise awareness for breast cancer.

“You’re touching your breasts anyway when you put Just Nips on, so I want to spread breast cancer awareness and teach women how to examine themselves safely and properly while they’re at it,” the New Yorker told Refinery29.

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A pair of Just Nips stick-on nipples retails at $9.99. According to the company’s founder, their primary target group is professional women in their 20s and 30s. During the recent Women’s March on Washington and Valentine’s Day, the product gained popularity with “women who are proud of who they are, comfortable in their bodies and want to experiment”.

The emergence of this product comes along a wider trend in recent years which has made visible areolas not only more acceptable but increasingly popular as well, as proven by Friends and Sex and the City episodes, as well as the Kardashians all ditching their bras lately.

“Before this I worked at Ralph Lauren for five years, and I know what it takes to cut through a cable knit sweater. Our ‘freezing’ product does just that,” Molly Borman told the New York Post.

Source:DatingForaCom
From:unilad

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