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Menstrual Problems: What They Are, Symptoms And Diagnoses

Menstrual Problems: What They Are, Symptoms And Diagnoses

Us women spend a considerable portion of our lives dealing with periods. No matter how many menstrual problems we may have, they’re still the reason why we can have children. I think all the struggles of the world are worth it. We all handle and deal with periods in our own way. Frankly speaking, we are the only ones that know what really works for us. One thing that helps us all, though, is keeping track of them.

Keeping track of your periods is an easy thing to do. Whether you prefer to keep track on a calendar or download one of those apps on your phone, they both work just fine. Keeping track is essential as you will notice every little change in your period cycle and consult your doctor if you have any concerns about any menstrual problems. Talking to other women about periods can be misleading because, as mentioned earlier, the cycle is different for every woman. So, instead of freaking out why your cycle is 35 days while your friend’s period is 28, keep track and figure out what’s normal for you and what is not.

Every woman experiences different periods, and the severity of the symptoms varies from woman to woman. Some of us experience regular menstrual cycles. Others are often challenged by problems that can be too difficult to deal with.

See also: 8+ Things Women Should Know Regarding Their Periods

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What are menstrual problems?

During the menstrual cycles, we experience a series of discomforts that are different from day to day and from cycle to cycle. However, these discomforts are all very normal. But, in the long journey of periods, it so may happen that we run into more difficulties. These menstrual problems include heavy periods, lack of periods for more than 90 days, painful periods and even severe PMS-ing.

PMS-ing

Referred to as the premenstrual syndrome, pmsing occurs one or two weeks before your period begins. They are accompanied by mood swings, irritation, bloating, cramps, backache, headache as well as fatigue. In some cases, you might experience either diarrhea or constipation. While all these are quite normal, we should make sure to measure the severity of each symptom. Contact your doctor if you see that any of these symptoms are interrupting your daily activities.

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Heavy periods

Heavy periods are also referred to as menorrhagia. Abnormal and prolonged bleeding is a serious condition. The blood loss is severe enough to interrupt your daily activities. Here are some of the symptoms of menorrhagia, according to Mayo Clinic. Women who experience such condition soak one or more pad or tampon within one hour for a few consecutive hours. Sometimes, they need double protection, meaning one tampon as well as a pad. When you bleed for more than one week or pass blood clots that are bigger than a quarter. You should see a doctor if you experience any of these.

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No periods

A part of menstrual problems is also amenorrhea. According to Mayo Clinic, amenorrhea is a condition in which women miss three menstrual cycles consecutively. Girls who haven’t gotten their period until the age of 15 are also diagnosed with amenorrhea. When it comes to symptoms, the most obvious sign of amenorrhea is lack of periods. However, there are some other symptoms that tag along, such as hair loss, headaches, changes in vision and even acne. It is very important to contact a doctor if you have missed the last three menstrual cycles. Even if you are not experiencing any other symptom mentioned above.

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Painful periods

Sure, all periods are a little painful. But, part of menstrual problems is also dysmenorrhea. Mayo Clinic describes such condition as excruciating pains that occur one or two days before the cycle begins and can last for four days. Other symptoms that you should look for are dull aches that seem to always be there, and cramps that seem to radiate towards your lower back and even thighs. The thing with painful periods is that some women even experience nausea and headaches. If you see that this condition is a monthly occurrence for you, or you notice that the symptoms get worse every month, then seek immediate medical attention.

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Diagnosing Menstrual Problems

The thing is you cannot diagnose yourself. Even if you have any of these symptoms, that doesn’t necessarily mean that they are indicating an underlying condition. The best thing to do is see a doctor whom you can trust. These symptoms that we talked about are here to help you figure out if you have a problem or not. Then, your doctor will make sure to examine you and see whether you do or do not have a condition.

One thing you can do is provide a list of reliable information before your appointment. Write down everything so you don’t forget, from cycle length to any symptom you have been experiencing. Then, the doctor may perform pelvic exams, blood tests, Pap smear tests, ultrasounds and any other needed test to identify the problem. The doctor will also provide you will solutions and approaches on how to tackle the condition.

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The thing is that early diagnoses of an underlying condition is always welcome and a great thing. You don’t have to put up with painful and heavy periods each month. Nowadays, medicine has developed immensely and there are quick, pain-free ways of finding out medical problems. Start taking care of yourself and it will be rewarding.

 

Before you go, you might not want to miss: The Right Ways Parents Should Use To Talk To Their Kids Regarding Periods

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