The Way This Teacher Is Teaching Consent To Third-Graders Is Absolutely Heartwarming

Consent might sound like a simple word, however, when you dig deeper for the meaning, it is so meaningful. “To give assent or approval” – is what the Merriam Webster dictionary describes the word consent like. Everyone should have the feeling of ‘consent’ in themselves. And, everyone should know that doing something without the other person giving you consent to, is wrong on so many levels. It’s like, you’re ignoring the fact of someone saying NO to you.

The best period of time to teach someone about consent is when they are still kids. This way, you will build their personalities and it will be with them, anytime, anywhere.

A third-grade teacher at Citizens of the World Charter School in Los Angeles, Liz Kleinrock, is making sure to let her third-grade students know about what consent is. She is teaching that to them in the best way there could be. I mean, one should always have in mind to proactively teach kids to do better.

 

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A post shared by Liz Kleinrock (@teachandtransform) on

Source: Teachandtransform

Although there are specific individuals out there that act like consent is confusing, in fact, the teacher from California is proving that it’s easy enough for third-graders to understand.

The third-grade teacher, Liz, explained that this is a physical interaction that the average 8- and 9-year-old might have.

This is what one of Liz’s students wrote when asked to explain what consent means. If an 8- or 9-year-old can learn what consent is, what stops a grown up to do so?

Source: @teachandtransform

For, instance, she admitted that some kids might enjoy getting a high five in the morning, however, there are some others that would rather not be touched at all. Or, she illustrated this with another example. When a student touches her to get her attention, she can use that as another opportunity to talk about consent.

All that the teacher from California wants is teach these little ones to learn how to be empathetic and show compassion toward one another.

This is another illustration of the third-year graders on consent.

Source: @teachandtransform

Liz admits that:

I think it’s easy to understand — just as with anything else, it takes practice and consistency. They’re still going to make mistakes, and these are learning opportunities.

A chart she posted on Instagram shows a straightforward look at exactly what consent means.

 

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A post shared by Liz Kleinrock (@teachandtransform) on

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Kleinrock didn’t hold back to refer to the recent confirmation battle over Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh -in the caption. She said:

Everything about Kavanaugh in the news has been making me HEATED

So whenever I get frustrated about the state of our country, it inspires me to proactively teach my kids to DO BETTER. Today was all about CONSENT.

In the chart, you can see various interactions where consent may be necessary, such as hugs, or other physical contacts, also, the language people can use. Kleinrock makes sure to note that consent sounds “positive and enthusiastic” adding examples of what people can say if they don’t want to give their consent.

While much of the national conversation around consent has had to with sex, Kleinrock’s lesson is about everyday actions.

She admitted for Buzzfeed that “It’s all about asking for permission to be able to do something, and she doesn’t think it’s complicated.”

As you can see, the spelling is not quite right, but, who cares. Look at the idea.

teacher teaching consent

Source: @teachandtransform

What Kleinrock hopes is that she will teach her student right about consent and to ensure that her students will be ready to talk about sexual consent when the time comes.

Way down the road, middle school, high school, can you really begin to learn consent within relationships if you can’t learn to keep your hands to yourself?

teacher teaching consent

Source: @teachandtransform

What do you think of consent? Share your thoughts on the comments’ section.

Before you go: First Grade Teacher Secured Her Special Needs Student To Herself So He Could Dance